peat soil encyclopedia

Peat Encyclopedia

2018-5-8  peat An organic soil or deposit; in Britain, a soil with an organic soil horizon at least 40 cm thick. Peat formation occurs when decomposition is slow owing to anaerobic conditions associated with waterlogging. Decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose is particularly slow for Sphagnum plants, which are characteristic of such sites, and hence among the principal peatforming plants.

Read More
Peat - Encyclopedia of Geochemistry Request PDF

Request PDF Peat - Encyclopedia of Geochemistry Definition Peat is an organic soil composed of partially decomposed plant and, to a lesser extent, animal remains. Precise definitions of ...

Read More
Peat Soil Article about Peat Soil by The Free Dictionary

Peat Soil. any one of a group of soil types formed under conditions of excess moisture from precipitation or from stagnant fresh or slowly running groundwaters that have some mineral content. Peat soils are the upper portion of peat bog deposits, formed below a layer of particular types of vegetation that thrive under conditions of excess ...

Read More
Peatlands Encyclopedia

2021-9-27  Accumulations of plants will continue to increase the thickness of the peat deposit until a soil formed entirely of peat is created. These deposits can be 40 feet (12 m) or more thick. Source for information on Peatlands: Environmental Encyclopedia dictionary.

Read More
Peat Soils SpringerLink

2018-5-4  Peat soils are the most dominant type of organic soils developed through centuries under wetland conditions by the accumulation of partially decomposed and undecomposed plant residues. The other type of organic soil is muck which also develops by the accumulation of organic soil materials, but in this type, materials are relatively well ...

Read More
Peat - an overview ScienceDirect Topics

2010-7-15  F.G. Bell, in Encyclopedia of Geology, 2005. Peat Soils. Peat represents an accumulation of partially decomposed and disintegrated plant remains that have been preserved under conditions of incomplete aeration and high water content. It accumulates in areas where there is an excess of rainfall and the ground is poorly drained.

Read More
Peat - an overview ScienceDirect Topics

D.H. Vitt, in Encyclopedia of Ecology, 2008 Nutrient Sequestration (Oligotrophification) Peat forms due to slow decompositional processes that allow organic materials to be deposited as peat. As organic material is deposited, it contains within its carbon matrix nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, which were originally incorporated in the cell structure of the living plants ...

Read More
peat Description, Formation, Uses Britannica

Peat formation. The formation of peat is the first step in the formation of coal.With increasing depth of burial and increasing temperature, peat deposits are gradually changed to lignite.With increased time and higher temperatures, these low-rank coals

Read More
Physical and Chemical Properties of Peat

2017-1-16  peat. Peat properties reflect the peat-forming environment, development process and the types of peat-forming plants. Peat consists of organic matter, mineral matter and water. Under natural conditions, the content of water in peat exceeds 80% and content of gases content is about 6%. In dry peat, the organic matter content can reach 50%.

Read More
Peatlands Encyclopedia

2021-9-27  Accumulations of plants will continue to increase the thickness of the peat deposit until a soil formed entirely of peat is created. These deposits can be 40 feet (12 m) or more thick. Source for information on Peatlands: Environmental Encyclopedia dictionary.

Read More
Peat SpringerLink

2016-4-7  The Irish Peatland Conservation Council defines peat as: “a soil that is made up of the partially decomposed remains of dead plants which have accumulated on top of each other in waterlogged places for thousands of years.Areas where peat accumulates are called peatlands. Peat is brownish‐black in color and in its natural state is composed of 90% water and 10% solid material”.

Read More
Peat - Academic Kids

2005-6-18  Peat is also dug into soil to increase the latter's capacity to retain moisture and add nutrients. This makes it of considerable importance agriculturally, for farmers and gardeners alike. This makes it of considerable importance agriculturally, for farmers and gardeners alike.

Read More
Peat-Free Organic Substrates Encyclopedia

Encyclopedia is a platform about science and scientists. Content on Encyclopedia tracks the latest progress in research and can be revised by readers at any time. ... M. Biological, physicochemical and plant health responses in lettuce and strawberry in soil or peat amended with biochar. Appl. Soil Ecol. 2016, 107, 1–12.

Read More
Peat The Canadian Encyclopedia

2006-2-7  Peat, living and partially decomposed organic matter, consists principally of decayed brown mosses, Sphagnum plants, sedges and other semiaquatic plant remains.Peat is formed slowly in water-logged areas by the decay of vegetation, mostly under anaerobic (oxygen-deficient) conditions, and contains up to 95% water by weight.Canada's extensive peatlands developed since the last glaciation,

Read More
Peat - Energy Education

2021-10-14  Peat is a soft, crumbly, dark brown substance that is formed from generations of dead and partially decaying organic matter.To form peat, the vegetation must fall and be buried in a relatively oxygen poor environment so that it can be

Read More
Peatlands and marshes, remarkable wetlands -

2016-11-28  Peat, very rich in carbon-containing compounds, is at the same time a humus, a soil (called histosol) and an imperfect sedimentary rock rather close to coal. It can be extracted, either to constitute a poor performing fuel, or to fertilize various crops during its slow degradation in a drier and more oxygenated environment [3] .

Read More
peat Description, Formation, Uses Britannica

Peat formation. The formation of peat is the first step in the formation of coal.With increasing depth of burial and increasing temperature, peat deposits are gradually changed to lignite.With increased time and higher temperatures, these low-rank coals are gradually converted to subbituminous and bituminous coal and under certain conditions to anthracite.

Read More
Classification of Peat and Peatland - ENCYCLOPEDIA OF

2017-1-16  Peat is a peculiar product of waterlogged ground, and peatland is the place where peat accumulates. To date, there are no widely agreed definitions of peat and peatland, because different scholars have adopted different standards. Peat consists of liquid, gaseous, and solid state matter, and its most important constituent is organic matter.

Read More
Physical and Chemical Properties of Peat

2017-1-16  peat. Peat properties reflect the peat-forming environment, development process and the types of peat-forming plants. Peat consists of organic matter, mineral matter and water. Under natural conditions, the content of water in peat exceeds 80% and content of gases content is about 6%. In dry peat, the organic matter content can reach 50%.

Read More
Peat SpringerLink

2016-4-7  The Irish Peatland Conservation Council defines peat as: “a soil that is made up of the partially decomposed remains of dead plants which have accumulated on top of each other in waterlogged places for thousands of years.Areas where peat accumulates are called peatlands. Peat is brownish‐black in color and in its natural state is composed of 90% water and 10% solid material”.

Read More
peat Infoplease

2021-9-29  peat, soil material consisting of partially decomposed organic matter, ... Infoplease is a reference and learning site, combining the contents of an encyclopedia, a dictionary, an atlas and several almanacs loaded with facts. Our editors update and regularly refine this enormous body of information to bring you reliable information.

Read More
Peat - chemeurope

Peat is also dug into soil to increase the soil's capacity to retain moisture and add nutrients. This makes it important agriculturally, for farmers and gardeners. Its insulating properties make it of use to industry. Peat fires are used to dry malted barley for use in Scotch whisky distillation.

Read More
Peat The Canadian Encyclopedia

2006-2-7  Peat, living and partially decomposed organic matter, consists principally of decayed brown mosses, Sphagnum plants, sedges and other semiaquatic plant remains.Peat is formed slowly in water-logged areas by the decay of vegetation, mostly under anaerobic (oxygen-deficient) conditions, and contains up to 95% water by weight.Canada's extensive peatlands developed since the last glaciation,

Read More
Peat-Free Organic Substrates Encyclopedia

Encyclopedia is a platform about science and scientists. Content on Encyclopedia tracks the latest progress in research and can be revised by readers at any time. ... M. Biological, physicochemical and plant health responses in lettuce and strawberry in soil or peat amended with biochar. Appl. Soil Ecol. 2016, 107, 1–12.

Read More
Peat - Energy Education

2021-10-14  Peat is a soft, crumbly, dark brown substance that is formed from generations of dead and partially decaying organic matter.To form peat, the vegetation must fall and be buried in a relatively oxygen poor environment so that it can be

Read More
Classification of Peat and Peatland - ENCYCLOPEDIA OF

2017-1-16  Peat is a peculiar product of waterlogged ground, and peatland is the place where peat accumulates. To date, there are no widely agreed definitions of peat and peatland, because different scholars have adopted different standards. Peat consists of liquid, gaseous, and solid state matter, and its most important constituent is organic matter.

Read More
Unsaturated hydraulic properties of Sphagnum moss and

Figure 8 shows the soil hydraulic properties based on the best identified model, PDI3, for both samples. The comparative figure helps to distinguish between the hydraulic properties of living moss (A) and decomposed peat (B). Shown are the soil WRC (top), and the HCC (bottom). The functions are based on the parameter values summarized in Table 7.

Read More
soil - Students Britannica Kids Homework Help

Soil chemists, physicists, mineralogists, and microbiologists conduct research on soil properties and behavior. Edaphologists study the soil as a medium for the production of crops. Soil scientists attempt to find ways of managing the soil so that it will provide maximum crop

Read More
Soil degradation - The Encyclopedia of World Problems

2021-11-23  Soil productivity is reduced by loss of soil nutrients and organic matter and the water-holding capacity of soil. Over the last 100 years, with the growth in consumption, world population and man's technical capacity, the cultivation of soils has increased, both extensively and intensively, but without a parallel increase in soil conservation measures.

Read More

Copyright © 2020.Company name All rights reserved.SiteMap